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Cotton Candy Cardigan from ToFebruary ♡

lulabo:

stephbeatz In the make up trailer, Andre reads his scripts aloud before he gets made up. It’s very soothing. He reads all the roles. #bts #rosasecretsbrooklyn99 #brooklyn99

#andre braugher as gina linetti #andre braugher as amy santiago #it’s all so amazing and i want 2 see it (via laralaralara)

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The basics are that for every one female-speaking character in family-rated films (G, PG and PG-13), there are roughly three male characters; that crowd and group scenes in these films — live-action and animated — contain only 17 percent female characters; and that the ratio of male-female characters has been exactly the same since 1946. Throw in the hypersexualization of many of the female characters that are there, even in G-rated movies, and their lack of occupations and aspirations and you get the picture.

It wasn’t the lack of female lead characters that first struck me about family films. We all know that’s been the case for ages, and we love when movies like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Frozen hit it big. It was the dearth of female characters in the worlds of the stories — the fact that the fictitious villages and jungles and kingdoms and interplanetary civilizations were nearly bereft of female population — that hit me over the head. This being the case, we are in effect enculturating kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society — Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more — stall out at around 17 percent because that’s the ratio we’ve come to see as the norm?

OK, now for the fun part: It’s easy, fast and fun to add female characters, in two simple steps. And I want to be clear I’m not talking about creating more movies with a female lead. If you do, God bless and thank you. Please consider me for that role.

Step 1: Go through the projects you’re already working on and change a bunch of the characters’ first names to women’s names. With one stroke you’ve created some colorful unstereotypical female characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they’ve had a gender switch. What if the plumber or pilot or construction foreman is a woman? What if the taxi driver or the scheming politician is a woman? What if both police officers that arrive on the scene are women — and it’s not a big deal?

Step 2: When describing a crowd scene, write in the script, “A crowd gathers, which is half female.” That may seem weird, but I promise you, somehow or other on the set that day the crowd will turn out to be 17 percent female otherwise. Maybe first ADs think women don’t gather, I don’t know.

And there you have it. You have just quickly and easily boosted the female presence in your project without changing a line of dialogue.

Yes, we can and will work to tell more women’s stories, listen to more women’s voices and write richer female characters and to fix the 5-to-1 ratio of men/women behind the camera. But consider this: In all of the sectors of society that still have a huge gender disparity, how long will it take to correct that? You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly half of Congress is women. But there’s one category where the underrepresentation of women can be fixed tomorrow: onscreen. In the time it takes to make a movie or create a television show, we can change what the future looks like.

There are woefully few women CEOs in the world, but there can be lots of them in films. We haven’t had a woman president yet, but we have on TV. (Full disclosure: One of them was me.) How can we fix the problem of corporate boards being so unequal without quotas? Well, they can be half women instantly, onscreen. How do we encourage a lot more girls to pursue science, technology and engineering careers? By casting droves of women in STEM jobs today in movies and on TV. Hey, it would take me many years to become a real nuclear physicist, but I can play one tomorrow.

Here’s what I always say: If they can see it, they can be it.

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- Geena Davis on gender equality in film and television [x] (via wesleywalesandersons)

myers-briggs personality types

↳ ENFJ (The Teacher)

ENFJ is one of the less common types in the population, especially for men. Among men, ENFJ is the second rarest type. ENFJs make up 3% of the general population.

ENFJs are idealist organizers, driven to implement their vision of what is best for humanity. They often act as catalysts for human growth because of their ability to see potential in other people and their charisma in persuading others to their ideas. They are focused on values and vision, and are passionate about the possibilities for people.

ENFJs are typically energetic and driven, and often have a lot on their plates. They are tuned into the needs of others and acutely aware of human suffering; however, they also tend to be optimistic and forward-thinking, intuitively seeing opportunity for improvement. The ENFJ is ambitious, but their ambition is not self-serving: rather, they feel personally responsible for making the world a better place.

Trivia:

  • most likely of all types to cope with stress by exercising
  • most likely of all types to believe in a higher spiritual power
  • ranked by psychologists as among least likely to have trouble in school
  • personal values include friendships, education & learning, creativity, and community service
  • among types highest in job satisfaction, but also among most likely to report plans to leave their jobs
  • commonly found in careers in religion, teaching, and the arts
  • famous enfjs: oprah winfrey, martin luther king jr., pope john paul ii, and margaret mead

O Saya - A.R. Rahman feat. M.I.A. - Slumdog Millionare (2008)

whalenotpetunias:

Pretty much every week someone asks me what music I like, and I have to admit to them that I don’t actually listen to very much music independently, and the only new music I’ve learned in the last two years is the fault of reshmarambles, who has caused me to be classier by recommending good music and giving me the ability to actually talk about music instead of being like, “well I know who the Beatles are?”

bedlamsbard:

earthlynation:

Snow Leopard

I like the one in the background that’s just staring at the leopard in the foreground like, “I cannot believe you are this stupid, Fred.”

terresdebrume:

Fandom is, essentially, the collective refusal of thousands of people across the world to be passive about the media they are exposed to.

I just wish people from the outside would realize how great it truly is.